Category Archives: Practice Matters

Care Leavers Conference – 24-October-2016

Part of National Care Leavers Week, Handle With Therapeutic Care was the title of this years’ conference mounted by The Consortium for Therapeutic Communities and National Care Leavers Week.  Focussing on experiences and practical support, in order to promote high quality transitions from care.

Thinking from an attachment-informed perspective; the support provided over many years by constant and consistent caregivers is likely to be particularly useful at the time of leaving care, and yet, in the scramble to look forward, this history may be forgotten.  (Presentation)

 

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  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Care Leavers Conference   24 October 2016
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Care Leavers Conference   24 October 2016
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Care Leavers Conference   24 October 2016
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Care Leavers Conference   24 October 2016
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Care Leavers Conference   24 October 2016

Training in trauma

As Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) come under funding pressure, concerns about children’s mental health and well-being place great strains on schools. IMO, schools good do a great deal more by providing some basic trauma training for staff, in much the same way as school staff have basic first aid, fire and health and safety awareness, programmes that raise trauma awareness are central to providing a safe environment for every pupil.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-35113899

 Training in trauma

for example: Trauma-Informed Practice for Schools

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Find Out About A Therapeutic Childcare Degree

If you want to know more about the FdA/BA Therapeutic Child Care programme, you can meet the therapeutic Child Care team at an interactive information morning on Thursday 13th February (between 10 and 12.30) at our Wrexham Campus.  It is an ideal opportunity to gain more detailed information about studying on the programme and about Glyndŵr University.  These specialist courses have been designed to promote and encourage excellence in work with children who have been traumatised through abuse.

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  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Find Out About A Therapeutic Childcare Degree
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  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Find Out About A Therapeutic Childcare Degree
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Find Out About A Therapeutic Childcare Degree

The Therapeutic Community Approach – Living-Learning Environments for 2014

The most significant thing about the therapeutic community approach has always been the focus on the quality of communication between the worker and the child, and the connections between the help provided by individuals and the task of the whole group. This is an approach that is made even more relevant by the difficult economic position that residential care finds itself in.  Groups work for children and young people and group care can be made to work for them too, in cost effective, value for money ways; but that is unlikely to happen by chance.

Fortunately, there is a long tradition and a body of literature to helps us know and understand the approach in therapeutic communities.  Clearly, not all therapeutic communities are the same, but in general they hold some things in common.  There is recognition that relationships and attachments matter, the provision of supportive yet challenging relationships, recognition of the enabling potential of giving young people appropriate control over their lives, and a great emphasis on creating a culture of enquiry (“What could this behaviour mean?”  “Why I am I feeling like this?”  “I wonder what their intention is?” etc.)  The aim is that all members of the community, children and adults work together to overcome difficulties and conflict, and all are encouraged to work with an open and equal spirit.

Therapeutic communities provide an integrated, planned environment with clear boundaries, close relationships and open resolution of problems, tensions and conflicts.  Daily life is filled with purposeful tasks (therapeutic, domestic, organisational, and educational) and there is a shared commitment to the goal of learning from the experience of living and/or working together.

Therapeutic work does not have to be confined to individual or group work therapy session; it also takes place in everyday interactions.  Although time is spent on assessment, planning and reviewing interventions, many opportunities arise for communication and support in every day practice. This is the concept of opportunity–led work.  The quality of this work lies in the skill of the worker to recognise the opportunity and respond appropriately, with emphasis on the distinction between reacting and responding: reacting in an un-thought out way can only serve to complicate matters; responding appropriately means dealing with the situation on a well thought out judgement.

A significant part of the work is reflecting on experiences, trying to understand and make sense of the behaviour of the children.  The capacity to provide for the needs of disturbed children is powerfully enhanced when the adult is able to reflect upon, and respond to, what is happening in the relationships with the child, in other words the adult consciously works from an understanding of the processes of development and interaction.  Reflecting on one’s experience of any interaction and being aware of how one feels and where these feelings originate is a process of on-going personal development.

 

 

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  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px The Therapeutic Community Approach – Living Learning Environments for 2014
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px The Therapeutic Community Approach – Living Learning Environments for 2014
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px The Therapeutic Community Approach – Living Learning Environments for 2014